A new budget “DuPont” crimp tool is bought to my attention

Preciva PR-3254 crimp tool

Back in 2015 when I first wrote up my crimp connectors page. I pointed out that there was no cheaply available tool which could crimp “DuPont” terminals properly (cheap Chinese connectors which resemble DuPont’s Mini-PV connector).

Crimped Mini-PV Terminals
Crimped Mini-PV look-alike Terminals

At the time pretty much all tools in the $30 or less price bracket got you a result like on the left, because the insulation crimp die was a ‘B’ shape when it needed to be an ‘O’ shape.

Comparison of the DuPont Mini-PV crimp tool, and the die of a typical budget tool

Anyway… onto the tool in question. This was bought to my attention by a reader, and it’s actually sold in a kit (Amazon UK / US). It’s very affordable and it’s got a die specifically designed for “DuPont” terminals. My first reaction: Wow. The bounty for such a tool has been out for 5 years now. Could this be the one?

First impressions unfortunately weren’t particularly good.

PR-3254 “DuPont” die compared to DuPont HT-208 (AWG 24) die

When the die is fully closed, it ends up with an uncomfortable “oval” shape, rather than the circular shape all DuPont original tools have. You cannot partially close it either because the wire part wouldn’t be crimped at all.

Top: AWG 24 wire crimped with PR-3254. Bottom: AWG 28 wire crimped with PR-3254

Results aren’t too bad. It’s doing the right thing, wrapping the insulation crimp instead of making a mess of it. For AWG 24 wire, there’s far too much force on the insulation, crushing and damaging it, but the wire part is reasonable.

For AWG 28 wire, force is about right on the insulation, but there’s not enough force on the wire part. In the long term, moisture may get into that and cause troubles. You could double it over to mitigate this to an extent.

Conclusion

It’s very encouraging to see a budget tool specifically designed for these terminals.

It does so-so job of AWG 28 on “DuPont” terminals. Its other dies are fairly standard and ones like it are found in other tools, for example the IWISS SN-2549. Don’t go rushing to buy it. I’m looking at another tool at present which may be a little better than this one.

This tool is probably OK for people who are building temporary/non critical things, however ultimately this particular effort appears to have stopped for a cigarette just short of the finish line.

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